What is a book coach?

The landscape of publishing has changed completely, and along with the digital revolution, new job roles have come along too. Amongst them is the role of the book coach. While there are plenty of book coaches around, it’s not a job title that everyone has come across, and every book coach will offer a unique range of skills and support to their clients. In fact, many people have already asked me, “But what is a book coach anyway?” So with that in mind, I wanted to explain what I understand the role of book coach to be, and how I go about helping my clients.

Cheering you on is one part of being a book coachFor me, book coach is actually a broad term that incorporates lots of different skills. When you choose me to be your book coach, you also work with me in a number of different guises. For example, I will be a:

Cheerleader: Often writers don’t want to show their work to anyone – especially their close friends and family – until it’s finished. That’s fair enough but it also means that there’s no one to share your victories with … whether those victories are finishing the first three chapters or overcoming writer’s block halfway through the book. When you work with me as a book coach I will be there to cheer you on all the way!

Taskmaster: One of the biggest problems writers encounter is staying focused and completing their book. Life tends to get in the way, other projects become more pressing and your book can be sidelined – sometimes permanently. As your book coach I will be a tough taskmaster, setting you goals and holding you accountable to them. However, because I’m also human and I know how busy life is, I’ll also be flexible enough to help you find a way of working that suits you – rather than sticking to a strict routine.

Adviser: As your adviser I will be sharing my knowledge and experience to help you find the right path on your publishing journey. ¬†Every aspiring author has lots of questions about writing, editing, publishing and more and while I don’t profess to know everything – who does? – I will do my best to find answers and solutions.

Reviewer: When you write, it’s often difficult to take an objective view of your work. You’re too close to it – it’s your baby – and it can be difficult to see those areas that perhaps don’t quite work or need development. Conversely, you may not see the sheer genius of your writing because you don’t believe yourself capable of it! As your book coach I will be happy to review sections of your work and offer feedback to help you make your book as great as it can possibly be. I am an experienced writer myself and also an avid reader – so I have a good idea of what works well.

Motivator: Writing a book can be difficult. You might find you get writer’s block or don’t feel confident in your own abilities, or you might just struggle to find the time to commit to your project. As your motivator I will be there to keep your spirits up and to help you find the time, place and pace that works for you. Together I know we can get that book written!

So there you have it: the five main roles of a book coach, in my mind, are as taskmaster, cheerleader, advisor, reviewer and motivator. If you have a book in you but need someone to keep you accountable, hold your hand, cheer you on and give you genuinely helpful feedback and advice, take a look at my book coaching services. The online coaching package provides up to three hours of customised coaching that you can take at a time that suits you; the complete coaching programme gives you everything you need to plan, write and publish your book. And if you’re not sure about working with a book coach, you can always take advantage of my free coaching call so we can explore whether it’s the right option for you. However, wherever you are in the writing process I believe I can help you. Just give me a call.


Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Leave a Reply

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>